Regular checkups with your dentist can do more than keep your teeth healthy – it can keep your body healthy too. There’s a strong correlation between one’s oral health and overall health.  The hygiene of your mouth can greatly affect the rest of your body.

Bacteria that accumulates on teeth may make the gums susceptible to infection.  In defense, your immune system attacks the infection leading to the gums being inflamed.  The inflammation continues until the infection is stabilized.  If left untreated, it can erode gums and teeth resulting in gum disease (known as periodontitis) and problems with other body parts.  

Gum Disease and Health Issues

Research from the Academy of General Dentistry shows a link between gum disease and other health problems, such as diabetes, digestive problems and heart disease. Women with gum disease are also more likely to give birth to pre-mature or low weight babies. 

Other studies reveals that most systemic diseases – diseases affecting the whole body – involve oral complications, such as mouth ulcers, swollen gums, and dry mouth.  Systemic diseases include diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, leukemia and oral cancer.

Gum Disease and Diabetes

The gum disease/diabetes relationship may be the strongest one of all.  Inflammation originating from the mouth may negatively affect the body’s ability to manage sugar levels. People with diabetes have problems controlling blood sugar levels since their body cells don’t break down sugar the way healthy body cells do.  This results in extremely high blood sugar and insulin levels.  To make matters more complicated, gum disease and diabetes appear to have a two-way relationship.  High blood sugar levels can also promote infections to grow, such as gum infections.   

Gum Disease and Heart Disease

Researchers at the American Academy of Periodontology found that people with gum disease are two times more likely to suffer from coronary artery disease than those without it.  The two diseases have a number of common risk factors, such as being overweight, unhealthy eating habits, and smoking.

If you suffer from gum disease, oral bacteria can make its way to your bloodstream and lead to infection in your heart and lungs. The bacteria can also stick to the insides leading to blockages and blood clots to form. All these factors greatly increase one’s risk of having heart complications, such heart disease, heart attacks and strokes. 

Establishing Good Hygiene Habits

You can minimize potential health complications by:

  • Brushing your teeth for 2-3 minutes after every meal with fluoride toothpaste.
  • Flossing daily to remove plaque and using mouth wash to get rid of bacteria.
  • Eating plenty of healthy foods, such as fruits and vegetables, to get your nutrients.
  • Avoiding cigarettes and alcohol, which increase one’s risk of developing gum disease and oral cancer.
  • Visiting your dentist annually for cleanings and to check for cavities and gum problems.   

Following these steps can not only protect your teeth, it can also save your life!

You notice that your dentures are starting to rub against your gums, leaving them sore.

Your denturist has already adjusted your dentures, but it’s still a bit loose and uncomfortable.

So what are your options?

It's probably time for a soft reline.

A soft reline involves using soft material that provides a cushioned buffer between your denture and gums tissues. The liner helps to keep your denture in place by restoring its snug fit. It also makes it more comfortable to wear and easier to chew with.

A soft reline is most suitable for people who have:

  • acute sore gum tissues

  • thin gum tissues

  • flat gum tissues


Maintaining good oral health is very important in life.  As we get older, we often think there’s not much we can do to strengthen our teeth once we pass a certain age.   We seem to believe that strong teeth can only be developed when we’re still young.   The good news is with some simple lifestyle adjustments, adults of any age can make their purely whites stronger.  

Tooth decay is largely based on mouth chemistry – a chemistry that can be changed at anytime in your life by adjusting your eating habits.  Decay begins when your teeth enamel become weak leaving you susceptible to cavities, chipping and other teeth problems. By eating the proper foods you can stop this process, known as demineralization, and reinforce your teeth enamel.  Here are 5 great foods for stronger healthier teeth.

You know how you should brush after every meal? Actually, you don’t. Sugar isn’t the main cause of cavities. And bleaching doesn’t weaken your teeth. With so many misconceptions surrounding dental health, it’s not surprising that we’ve made up a few myths over the years to explain our dental issues. So why do we believe these myths? We usually heard them from somewhere, and they get repeated over and over again that we just take them for face value. But when it comes to your dental health, having false information can be dangerous. For your benefit, we have debunked four of the most common dental myths below:

Gum Disease: What Are The Stages?

Did you know 7 out of 10 Canadians will have gum disease during their life time?

In fact, it’s the most widespread oral disease in Canada. Gum disease can start out painlessly but can quickly become a serious problem if left untreated.

If you think you have gum disease (and even if you don’t) it’s important to get the facts so you know what you’re dealing with.

 


Do you experience pain when drinking something hot or cold?

Do you hate brushing because it’s uncomfortable?

If you answered yes, you probably have sensitive teeth.

So how do get sensitive teeth?
Tooth sensitivity happens because of exposed dentin due to enamel loss or receding gums. Dentin is the grayish or yellowish tissue that is found under your enamel and contains a large amount of tubes. These tubes run from the tooth’s outer surface to the nerve, and when exposed are highly sensitive to temperature changes. That’s why eating specific foods (such as hot, cold or spicy) may be painful.  

Are you afraid of seeing the dentist?
Do you dread your dental appointment for weeks?

If so, you’re not alone.

Studies show that as many as 75% of people have at least some fear when visiting the dentist.

For some people its general anxiety; however, for others, it’s extreme dental phobia where they’ll break into a sweat just thinking about going to the dentist. People with dental phobia have an intense fear – so much so that they’ll avoid any dental treatments. In a recent study by the Huffington Post, it was shown that most of this fear is passed on from parent to child.

While having some nervousness every now and then while seeing the dentist is understandable, avoiding the dentist is definitely not the answer. By not seeing the dentist, you risk serious consequences for your oral health.....

One of the best drinks for your teeth is...

Green tea.

Yep, that’s right.

While it’s well known that green tea offers a host of health benefits - such as heart health, lose weight and cancer prevention - it also helps protect your smile as well.

So why green tea is good for you?

Where in your mouth is the most important place to clean?

In between your teeth. This is where plaque starts forming and is also the hardest place to reach.  Flossing has long been the accepted as the best way to clean these hard to reach areas. However, another device is becoming an increasingly popular option: the waterpik.

A waterpik is a device that uses the power of water pressure to flush out bacteria and food debris. It also offers an assortment of interchangeable tips to perform specific cleaning duties, such as cleaning around braces. Nevertheless, both floss and waterpiks have their pros and cons.
 

While enjoying an alcoholic beverage once in a while is fine, too much of it can be bad thing.

Besides giving you a bad hangover, drinking too much can seriously harm your gums and teeth – especially when consumed on a frequent basis. And since most people drink at least socially, it’s a good idea to be aware of the effects of alcohol on your oral health.

So what are these harmful effects?